Why are we called One In Christ?

 

Psalms 133:1-3 (KJV)​

Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity.  It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron’s beard: that went down to the skirts of his garments; as the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the Lord commanded the blessing, even life for evermore.

The meaning of our Colors

 

1 Chronicles 29:1-3​


Gold:

The color gold symbolizes the Glory of God; divine nature; holiness; eternal deity; the Godhead; purification.

Silver:

The color silver symbolizes paid price for redemption; price of a soul; Word of God; strength; Spirit; Revelation; Grace; divinity; wisdom; purity.​

Want to know more about One In Christ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOLY COMMUNION

 

BACKGROUND

As early as the Emmaus experience on the day of Resurrection, recorded in Luke 24:13-35, we recognized the presence of Jesus Christ in the breaking of bread. The traditional Jewish practice of taking bread, blessing and thanking God, and breaking and sharing the bread took on new meaning for them. When followers of Christ gathered in Jesus’ name, the breaking of bread and sharing of the cup was a means of remembering his life, death, and resurrection and of encountering the living Christ. They experienced afresh the presence of their risen Lord and received sustenance for their lives as disciples. As the church organized itself, this custom became the characteristic ritual of the community and the central act of its worship.

 

Like baptism, Holy Communion is regarded as a sacrament. That is, it’s an act of worship ordained by Christ and is a means of grace. This does not mean that we become any more worthy of God’s grace by taking part in Communion. Rather, we open ourselves to the divine love that’s already there; we become more ready to receive that love and to respond to it.

 

As with baptism, we use common, physical gifts of the earth, bread and wine—though here at One In Christ Ministries, we prefer grape juice. All Christians are welcome at our table, whatever their denomination. Holy Communion is a family meal, and all Christians are members of Christ’s family. Therefore, in each congregation, when we receive the bread and cup, we join with millions of brothers and sisters across the ages and around the world.

 

Holy Communion (or the Lord’s Supper) is a mystery too deep for words. Its meaning will vary for each of us and from one time to another. But three essential meanings are caught up in this proclamation in our Communion service: “Christ has died; Christ is risen; Christ will come again”

 

 

"CHRIST HAS DIED"

In part, Communion is a time to remember Jesus’ death, his self-giving sacrifice on our behalf. As he said to the disciples at their last meal together, “Do this in remembrance of me” (1 Corinthians 11:24).

 

In remembering his passion and crucifixion, we remember our own guilt; for we know that in our sin we crucify Christ many times from day to day. So the Lord’s Supper is a time of confession: “We confess to the Lord that we have not loved HIM with our whole heart….and we ask for forgiveness.”

 

"CHRIST HAS RISEN"

But Communion is not a memorial service for a dead Jesus. It’s not a time to wallow in our own guilt. It’s a time to celebrate the Resurrection, to recognize and give thanks for the Risen Christ. The bread and wine represent the living presence of Christ among us—though we do not claim, as some denominations do, that they become Christ’s body and blood.

 

In Luke’s Resurrection story, the Risen Christ broke bread with two of his followers at Emmaus, “then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him” (24:31). So, as we’re nourished by this meal, our eyes are opened; and we recognize Christ here in our congregation, our community, and our world. What’s our response? Heavenly Father, we thank you!

 

"CHRIST WILL COME AGAIN"

In Communion we also celebrate the final victory of Christ. We anticipate God’s coming reign, God’s future for this world and all creation. As Jesus said, “I tell you, I will never again drink of this fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s Kingdom” (Matthew 26:29).

 

We believe that we’re partners with God in creating this future, but the demands of discipleship are rigorous. In the bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper, in the fellowship of Christian friends gathered at his table, we find the nourishment we need for the tasks of discipleship ahead.